AT&T Next Offers Yearly Upgrades, Contract-Free Installment Plans

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AT&T Next Offers Yearly Upgrades, Contract-Free Installment Plans

AT&T has announced a new plan that will allow customers to trade in their devices every year for a new device, or get handsets on a payment plan very similar to T-Mobile’s “contract-free” options.

Under the new plan, customers can purchase a handset or tablet without any down payment and will be required to pay monthly payments—which vary by device—for up to 20 months. Using the Galaxy S 4 as an example, AT&T says that the payments will be $ 32/month. After 20 months, the device is yours to keep.

After 12 months, however, customers can trade in their old handset and upgrade to a new device. They will no longer owe any money on the old handset and will take on payments for the new phone.

The neat part is that if you choose not to upgrade, you can pay off your device at any time. Wireless service is required to be active for as long as you’re paying off the phone, but strictly speaking, you’re not paying for a service contract. Once you pay off your installment plan (which you can do any time, as fast as you want), you can leave AT&T. Two months, six months, ten months, twenty months, it doesn’t matter. Once your phone is paid off, you can leave your carrier whenever you want.

Technically, this is no-different to buying your phone off-contract and getting a month-to-month plan, except that AT&T will help finance the phone. This essentially grants everyone that can pass a credit check a free 20-month, zero-interest credit card to buy new hardware with the chance to swap out hardware every 12 months. The downside, of course, is that owning your phone completely won’t reduce your monthly service bill.

AT&T Customers Can Get a New Smartphone or Tablet Every Year With No Down Payment With “AT&T Next” | AT&T via Android Police

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Flickr Offers 1TB of Free Space for Your Photos, $50 Yearly for No Ads

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Yahoo, in an attempt to make its photo-hosting service Flickr relevant again, decided to offer 1TB of free space to all users. The downside? Everyone who doesn’t pay $ 50 per year gets ads.

An entire terabyte of space is a generous gift to users who still care about storing tons of high-resolution photos. (For the record, I’m one of them, but most people like posting low-resolution images to Instagram nowadays.) Nevertheless, not all users are pleased because the previous paid service offering didn’t have a storage limit (although existing pro users get grandfathered in). Flickr’s new “Ad Free” tier costs an extra $ 5 per year and puts a limit on storage. While 1TB seems like more than most anyone could need for their photo collection, Flickr also decided to offer a “doublr” tier that provides an extra terabyte of space for a whopping $ 500 per year.

While it’s hard to argue against the free space Flickr now offers its users, as the photo sharing service lost its momentum shortly after Yahoo acquired it (and slowed development to a crawl), we’re saddened to see the users who paid to support Flickr over the years get the short straw. Even still, the disenfranchised won’t find a better deal from Flickr’s rivals.

Yahoo Drops Flickr Pro To Compete With Facebook, Still Offers Two Paid Tiers For Ad Haters And Power Users | TechCrunch

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