John Wooden: The Difference Between Winning and Succeeding

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John Wooden on Leadership

Winning and succeeding are not the same thing. Coach John Wooden talks about his beliefs and the philosophy that shaped his life. He says:

“Peace of mind attained only through self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do the best of which you’re capable. I believe that’s true. If you make the effort to do the best of which you’re capable, trying to improve the situation that exists for you, I think that’s success, and I don’t think others can judge that; it’s like character and reputation — Your reputation is what you’re perceived to be; your character is what you really are. And I think that character is much more important than what you are perceived to be.”

[…]

I believe starting on time, and I believe closing on time. And another one I had was, not one word of profanity. One word of profanity, and you are out of here for the day. If I see it in a game, you’re going to come out and sit on the bench. And the third one was, never criticize a teammate. I didn’t want that. I used to tell them I was paid to do that. That’s my job. I’m paid to do it. Pitifully poor, but I am paid to do it. Not like the coaches today, for gracious sakes, no. It’s a little different than it was in my day. Those were three things that I stuck with pretty closely all the time.

Watch the video of his talk below.

 For a deeper dive on how to create a winning organization, I recommend Wooden on Leadership: How to Create a Winning Organization.

 

[image of Wooden’s 12 Lessons in Leadership and his acclaimed Pyramid of Success]


Conversation Agent – Valeria Maltoni

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Wooden Batteries Might Be The Next Big Thing In Eco-Technology

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If we’re trying to make the world a greener place, moving away from alkaline batteries might be the first step. That might be easier now that there are people developing wooden batteries.

Liangbing Hu and Nicholas Weadock from the University of Maryland are working on a “wooden” battery. Their idea is to use natural fibrous structures present in the tree to excite charged particles and create an electrical current.

The batteries also replace the commonly used lithium with sodium. Since sodium is not as efficient at holding charge you won’t find these batteries used in cellphones but they could prove to be useful in storing large amounts of energy from sources like the sun and wind. Read more…

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