Snapchat Introduces “Story Explorer” To Offer Users More Ways To View Content

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So, you didn’t make it into your city’s Snapchat Story today? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. With over 100 million users on Snapchat, your chances of making it into your city’s live story are slim to none… until today. A brand new update that Snapchat rolled out increases your chances of getting your Snaps featured in Stories found within the app centered around events, locations, and more.

The launch of this new feature called “Story Explorer” allows users to explore more public Snaps then ever before. Story Explorer expands specific segments of Snaps in a story. For example, instead of seeing just one photo or video from Beyonce’s concert in the New York story, users will now be able to swipe up on that specific snap, and explore more photos and videos from that same concert.

Snapchat is launching Story Explorer on the New York and Los Angeles Live Stories to start, with more cities and events rolling out soon. With this feature, the Snapchat community will now get to explore every moment in more depth, getting more then just a preview of what’s going on in their city.

Social Media Week

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A Millennial’s Point of View: Representing Part of a Connected Class

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A Millennial’s Point of View: Representing Part of a Connected Class

A Millennial’s Point of View: Representing Part of a Connected Class

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Technology is no longer an entity that exists on the fringes of daily life.  Now, rather, it has become an organic aspect of the way that we live it.  The beauty about the ubiquity with which technology and social media have nestled themselves into our world is that what was once considered a threat to the conventions of communication has become the connective tissue that allows us each to function as a meaningful synapse in a digitally connected world. It is a role that is both vital and surprisingly intuitive to play.

Social media takes the paradigm of human society and shifts it into a space where geographical, socio-economic and even linguistic barriers are irrelevant.  Every morning, when I roll over to shut off my alarm, check missed emails and sleepily scroll through Twitter, I am making a decision to engage in that society, to exist and communicate in that space.  Technology and digital media allow me to be a world citizen from my small and specific geographic corner.  I fill idle spaces in my day by keeping up with current events in real-time.  I never miss a beat with my best friend’s faraway life as a law student in northern Idaho.  I am living a vastly different life from the billions of other people with access to social media technology, but I am living it on the same platforms.

As someone who grew up during the “internet generation”, I have always existed in a connected world.   From painstakingly crafting our AIM Messenger “Away” messages (now a hilarious relic immortalized as a popular meme) to watching the 2008 election unfold on our Facebook feeds, my generation has always lived a significant portion of our lives online.

When I was in middle school in the mid-2000s, I changed my afore-mentioned “Away” message constantly.  I felt that the correct, blindingly illegible font-and-highlight color combination and angsty pop-punk song lyric would present me to the world as the kind of thoughtful, mysterious 12 year-old that I so desperately wanted to be (and certainly, certainly never was).  I spent far too much time on this meaningless creative endeavor, wasting the hours that I otherwise could have spent breathing fresh air or learning a skill or, perhaps, just not completely embarrassing myself day after day on the internet.  But I grew up in a climate that taught me to care deeply about my place in the digital world, and if I was presenting as a confused pre-teen misfit, well, at least it was accurate.

Our emotional investment in online presence does not mark the demise of human society.  Rather, it is a sign that we are living our lives in this exciting, limitless space that combines the digital world with the “real” one.  It is not an illusion, but an opportunity.  We are mobile, social and franchised – we are part of a connected class.

Hayden Freedman is a recent graduate of Georgetown University and a digital media professional based in NYC.

Social Media Week

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