How Scrolling Behavior on E-Commerce Sites Is Evolving [Infographic]

Share

Internet users on all devices are scrolling farther and farther down on e-commerce site pages, according to a recent report from Content Square.

The report was based on data collected between August 2013 and November 2014 from 50 million browsing sessions on the websites of 100 top global retailers.

Scroll rate—the position of the last line viewed by a consumer—increased on e-commerce sites across all devices between 2013 and 2014, the analysis found.

Scroll rate increased 5% on desktops: Consumers went an additional 40 pixels lower on e-commerce pages, on average, in 2014 than in 2013.

The scroll rate on smartphones increased 18% in 2014 (300 additional pixels per page), and 42% on tablets (1,000 additional pixels).

Other key findings from the report include the following:

  • 15% of consumers now make it to the footer of an e-commerce page, compared with just 5% in 2011.
  • E-commerce pages in China are 20,000 pixels tall on average, compared with 2,500 pixels in Europe.
  • Consumers who scroll more tend to buy more. For example, people on tablets who make a purchase scroll 25% farther down on a page, on average, than non-buyers.

Check out the infographic for more insights:

About the research: The report was based on data collected between August 2013 and November 2014 from 50 million browsing sessions on the websites of 100 top global retailers.

Ayaz Nanji is an independent digital strategist and the co-founder of Inbound ContentWorks, a marketing agency that specializes in content creation for businesses and brands. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. His past experience includes working for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji

MarketingProfs All In One

Share

Stay Fit By Scrolling Web Pages with a Treadmill

Share

If walking at a treadmill desk seems a little too boring or repetitive, you can try hacking the treadmill to scroll web pages.

Brian Peiris realized that he could run his treadmill’s sensor through an Arduino with little difficulty. From there, just a few lines of Python helped interpret the spinning of the belt as mouse wheel movements, effectively turning the treadmill into a giant page scroller. If you love the idea of getting exercise at your desk, nothing will motivate you better than using the treadmill to scroll through Wikipedia.

If you’re feeling particularly daring, Brian also includes a tutorial to throttle your download speeds based on how quickly you walk, as you can see in the video above. Want to download a new game? Better start running. Check out the source link for more details.

Using a manual treadmill to scroll a web page and more | brian.peiris.name via Hack A Day

Lifehacker

Share