This Interactive Map Shows Exactly How Much Daylight Saving Time Affects You

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This Interactive Map Shows Exactly How Much Daylight Saving Time Affects You

Daylight saving time always causes a pretty sudden shock to our internal clocks, but if you’ve every wondered exactly how much it changes things, cartographer Andy Woodruff created an interactive map that shows just how many sunless evenings (and mornings) you get.

Daylight saving time has a pretty big impact on sunrises and sunsets across the country, but the effect isn’t even across time zones. For example, the sun rises about 40 minutes earlier in New York than it does in Detroit. So, to illustrate the effect of daylight saving time, Woodruff created a bunch of different visualizations alongside an interactive map you can play with yourself. He shows how the country would look with daylight saving time abolished (nicer sunrise times) as well as if it were in effect all the time (dark sunrise times and late sunset times).

This knowledge certainly isn’t enough to get over Seasonal Affective Disorder, but at least it gives you a better visual of exactly what the days are like.

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Where to hate daylight saving time and where to love it | Andy Woodruff

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How Old Were You When You Started Saving for Retirement? 

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How Old Were You When You Started Saving for Retirement? 

“Save early and save often” is the mantra of just about every personal finance expert. But we all get started on our retirement savings journey at different times. When did you start and what prompted you to do it?

Every year counts. Wells Fargo’s retirement study found that working Americans age 55-59 had saved three times as much as those age 60 or older, simply through the power of compound interest and starting earlier. (The 55-59 group started saving at an average age of 31, while those 60 and older started at an average age of 37.)

If you are or were late to the game, though, and short of how much you should have saved by now for your age group, there are still ways to catch up, from being a bit more frugal so you can make catch up contributions to adjusting your asset allocation for more risk (which, obviously, involves more risk).

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Let’s share when we started, the things that jump started our retirement planning, and what we’re doing at this point (whether trying to catch up or just coasting along).

Photo by aag_photos.

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