One-Third of Americans Admit to Doing Something Just to Be Able to Talk About It on Social Media

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Ford recently conducted a survey about Americans’ sense of adventure in order to commemorate the Mustang’s 50 years. Megan Garber of at The Atlantic uncovered this tidbit from the survey:

When Ford asked its survey participants, “Have you ever, even once, done something just so you could post about it on social media?” 16 percent of them replied, “yes, more than once.” And 13 percent of them replied, “yes, once.” Which means that nearly a third of Ford’s respondents have done something simply to write or tweet or post or talk about it online.

It’s very possible that more people have done this, but did not admit to doing so.

We’re conflicted about this. On the one hand, it is unsettling that people would do things for the sole purpose of sharing them on social media. Narcissism, anyone? (Look at me! Look at this cool thing I did this weekend!)

On the other hand, if social media is prompting people to get out of their desks and do something adventurous, all the more power to them (even if they can’t stop with the selfies).

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One-Third of Consumers Abandon Wearable Tech Devices

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Research from Endeavour Partners found that while one in 10 American adults own an activity tracker, half of them no longer use it. Similarly, one-third of American consumers who own smartwatches and other wearables stop using them within six months.

According to the Guardian, the Endeavour Partners study and unsuccessful for-sale ads for wearable tech at bargain prices on eBay and the like point to something still unsolved by primitive wearable devices: “They’re just not that good at exciting us.” Problems with usefulness, battery life and appearance may be, in part, why early adoption remains sluggish.

Perhaps the arrival of Android Wear will make a difference – and that the incorporation of Google Now, voice search, and the “cards” system that seems to be part of Android Wear will all add up to an experience that delights the second-generation wearables buyers. It remains to be seen, though. There’s a gap between the obvious extra utility that digital music players – or early smartphones – offered, and the very thin reasoning being used to justify a computer on your wrist or waist.

See the Guardian’s full report here.

*featured image credit: www.cnbc.com

*image credit: www.digitaltrends.com

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