How to Become a Better Copywriter: 21 Tips from the Experts

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Want to get better results from your web pages? Then you have to get the copy right. Whether you’re writing landing page copy or tweaking button text, sending the right message will increase conversions. That’s why a good copywriter is a great investment. One way to improve as a copywriter is to learn from the best. […]

The post How to Become a Better Copywriter: 21 Tips from the Experts appeared first on The Daily Egg.


The Daily Egg

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Winter Haircare from the Experts – Jo Hansford

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With winter approaching, Rebecca Anne Milford goes to hair care mecca Jo Hansford in Mayfair and finds out how to give hair a lift when the seasons are winding down.
Although there are many reasons to grumble about the approaching winter (and goodness knows, we Brits do), I secretly adore parts of the colder seasons. I think my favourite time for fashion has to be autumn, when all the chunky knits and berry colours are resplendent in shop windows, making me feel cosy just looking at them. It’s a time for change – a time to re-evaluate your wardrobe and think about how you want to go forward with style. And, naturally, this applies to hair too.
I have blonde hair, highlighted, and in summer it turns into a mess of beachy waves, sun bleached to a shade Pammy would be proud of, able to look dishevelled and unkempt in pub gardens and foreign climates. But, since the autumn comes along, I am aware I need a new look. And I also need to make sure I protect it. So, I went along to Jo Hansford in Mayfair to find out what was best to do.
The salon itself is gorgeous – all calming greys and classic shining silvers, with the odd spotlight adding a glamorous touch. Minimalist, stylish chic, it was opened in 1993 by Jo Hansford, the much admired ‘First Lady of Colour’, who counts HRH Duchess of Cornwall, Elizabeth Hurley and Natalie Imbruglia as her fans. The salon has been awarded the title of ‘Best Hair Salon in Mayfair’ by the Mayfair Awards, and Jo Hansford herself has an MBE for outstanding service to the hairdressing industry. So basically, I had come to the perfect place.
A Warmer Highlighted Look for the Cooler Season
Today I’m being looked after by Creative Director Jaclyn Smith, and we discuss the options for improving my colour. Now we’re going into a new season she tells me one popular choice that she recommends for blondes and brunettes alike is the need to break up the block of hair by adding some key ribbons of colour. This will add depth and warmth, making my whole look more tonal.
There are two ways to do this, and we choose the more time efficient strategy – to add a half head of highlights throughout, and then go over the whole head at the end with a kind of base breaker, to marry it together.
First she checks my existing tones, referring to the hairline for my natural colour and then also the colours that are flowing throughout. After checking two different base colours Jaclyn recommends the deeper shade, since after shampooing it can fade, and I still want the warmth there.
So, we’ve chosen a highlight and a lowlight, and the half head begins. Jaclyn is a pro, and so is adept at threading the colours through with speed and expertise. It’s left to develop and then I’m taken over to the sinks, having it washed out section by section.
After this the base breaker is applied – a tonal colour that can bring all the hues together in one melodious, warm blonde. So, the result? From this first image, to the second two (complete with an absolutely lovely blow-dry from stylist Michaela.)
The colour is warmer, while still having brighter gold streaks running through that catch the light and lift the whole head of hair. Absolutely LOVE my autumnal look for the new season!
So, what about Brunettes and Redheads? 
A popular way for brunettes to warm up this season is through ‘strobing’. This is when a lighter brown is used in beams around the face to brighten up the hairline. When skin gets paler in the winter then hair colour often needs enhancing, and so this technique is ideal. A great option for redheads is the use of vegetable colour – this allows for a non-toxic treatment to change the tone of the hair. Not only is it non-permanent, and so can be experimented with, but it has a luscious high-shine that really invigorates the colour at this time of year. It’s especially good for those with mousy coloured hair that want to add a noncommittal, luxuriant shade to dull hair.
Hair Saviours for Winter
We all know what it’s like in winter – there’s no more casually letting your barnet drip dry in the sun, and over styling and drying means it’s a prime time for strand breakage. It’s essential to ensure that hair stays nourished during the colder seasons, and Jo Hansford are using a new and rather groundbreaking technique for those with weakened hair that’s prone to breaking. Olaplex is a new product that people are going mad for in the States – and for good reason. It actually multiplies the bonds in your hair, working from the inside out to soften, revitalise and strengthen. It’s wonderful for repair and allows colour to hold better. Could this be the end of bad hair days? Quite possibly!
Autumn and Winter Trends
The most prominent trend when going into colder seasons is to add depth and richer tones to the hair. And warmer roots are still very fashionable, with hair fading at the ends – so long as the condition doesn’t look dry.  Apparently some of the most frequently requested colours are from Victoria’s Secret model Alessandra Ambrosio and Jessica Biel.
    Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 10.47.36
The latter is rocking the ‘Ecaille colour’ – touted as the new Ombre. The word means ‘tortoiseshell’, and Jaclyn says that ‘Ecaille is a healthy and glossy update for Ombre fans or those who felt it was too stark for their style. Ecaille gives hair a soft, multi-tonal look without any harsh lines to compliment your natural tones.’ I can see this continuing to be a high hit in 2016, so book yourself in at Jo Hansford and be ahead of the game!
(Celeb images from Fanpop.com and Stylecaster.com)

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