5 Reasons Ted Cruz is the Perfect GOP Candidate to Defeat Democrats in 2016

Share


This is arguably the most crucial Presidential election of this generation. In fact, a win for Republicans this time around may have more of an effect on the country than Ronald Reagan’s in 1980 or Bill Clinton’s in 1992. Both caused dramatic changes to the way that America operated, but neither will be as important as what happens next year.

Ted Cruz is a man of seconds. He’s viewed by many as the most conservative overall candidate, but that’s the extent of his polarization. Otherwise, he’s the right combination of being the second most this or the second most that. It’s a combination that would bring certain victory in a general election regardless of whether it’s the likely opponent of Hillary Clinton or if Bernie Sanders can mount a serious opposition.

An article on liberal MSNBC points out the five areas where Cruz is second to another candidate. Combined, they make for a very potent campaign.

Here are the five “seconds” that combined reveal Cruz as the top choice.

1. Carson’s Evangelical Appeal

Ben Carson Ted Cruz

Even though recent controversy about Ben Carson’s foreign policy knowledge has turned a good number of evangelicals way, he has been the chief recipient of the evangelical vote. This is where Cruz, the second favorite among evangelicals, has the power to unite them towards voting.

2. Trump’s Outsider Appeal

Ted Cruz Donald Trump Outsiders

Donald Trump is the outsider many Republicans love. Unfortunately for him, he’s proving that he’s such an outsider that he’s actually alienating himself from those who want at least a smidgen of political sense. Sure, those who support him wholeheartedly will never see the errors of his ways, but how he’s handled Carson and more recently John Kasich demonstrate an immaturity that will scare most voters away from him.

Cruz has made many enemies among Washington DC insiders, which makes him ideal for those who find his outsider status appealing while still wanting a semblance of political know-how. Cruz has both going for him.

3. Rubio’s Minority Status and Campaign Discipline

Ted Cruz Marco Rubio Campaign

Marco Rubio has had the fact that he’s missed so many Senate votes come across as a negative despite the fact that he’s missed fewer than candidates Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton when she was a Senator, and John Kerry. The reason he’s missed the votes is because he’s been running a very solid campaign, attending fundraisers and rallies in an effort to solidify his spot as the Republican Establishment’s frontrunner.

Next to Rubio, Cruz has been nearly as dedicated. He’s made more Senate votes and spent less time on the road, but not by much. He has a better ground game and infrastructure than Rubio, though, so one could argue that he’s running an even better technical campaign, but for the sake of this article we’ll call him a close second.

Then, there’s the Hispanic heritage aspect, a factor that will play a role in the general election.

4. The Rand Paul Libertarian Votes

Rand Paul Ted Cruz

There was little doubt that Rand Paul was going to pick up his father’s mantle and be the voice of the Libertarians in this election. Unfortunately for him, he didn’t really do that, at least not definitively. Even before he sunk near the bottom on the polls, he was already being criticized by much of his base who were starting to see Cruz as the more Libertarian option even if he’s never claimed their philosophy by name.

5. The Money Factor, a la Jeb Bush

Jeb Bush Ted Cruz

Cruz has raised the second most direct money for his campaign. Only Jeb Bush has raised more through his Super PACs. Most importantly, he has the most cash on hand. While he’s not the best at direct fundraising (yet) nor is he at the top of the Super PAC fundraising, he’s right where he needs to be.

The Right Combination

America is going to need a candidate they can trust in order to turn the tide away from the liberal agenda that we’ve experienced for the last seven years. Cruz is best positioned to do that in the general election. The only question is whether or not he can do it in the primaries first.

Soshable

Share

House Democrats Introduce Working Families Resolution and State Report Cards

Share
3 Flares Twitter 3 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 StumbleUpon 0 Email Filament.io 3 Flares ×

Minority nurse working at her job in a hospital with family

WASHINGTON – In honor of hardworking families across the nation, today, 109 House Democrats introduced H. Res. 506, the Working Families Resolution. This resolution calls on Congress to take up the responsible policy solutions working families need to make a better life for themselves and their families. Earlier this week, in commemoration of National Work and Family Month, Members came together for a Working Families Day of Action to highlight the many ways Congress can continue to support our nation’s working families.

“We know that families across the nation are working harder than ever before, but they are still struggling to make ends meet,” said Ranking Member Bobby Scott (D-VA). “Rather than address the very problems facing working people in our country, this Congress has wasted taxpayer dollars on the Benghazi Committee and tried more than 60 times to roll back the Affordable Care Act. It’s time for Congress to get to work on restoring economic stability for our nation’s families and the Working Families Resolution outlines how we can get this done.  The policies in the resolution will strengthen our workforce, strengthen our families, and strengthen our economy.”

“October is National Work and Family Month, and working families today face grave challenges,” said Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (D-CT). “The greatest economic challenge facing Americans today is that too many jobs do not pay enough money for people to live on. The Working Families Resolution reflects an agenda designed to change that reality. If Congress is serious about making work-life balance a right for all Americans, and not just a privileged few, the Majority should bring up the bills outlined in this resolution immediately.”

The Working Families Resolution outlines ten pieces of legislation that will:

  • Boost wages. American workers are more productive than ever but they are still not seeing their fair share of the wealth they create. The Resolution includes the Raise the Wage Act to increase the minimum wage and abolish the outdated tipped minimum wage; theWorkplace Action for a Growing Economy (WAGE) Act to strengthen workers’ ability to collectively bargain for higher wages and better working conditions; and the Payroll Fraud Prevention Act to end the misclassification of employees as independent contractors which leads to the erosion of wages and benefits.
  • Help workers balance work and family life. The world has changed a lot in the last 30 to 40 years, but the workplace has not. If we want strong families, we need to address the realities working parents face today. The Resolution includes policies to ensure that no worker has to choose between their income and their health or their children. The Healthy Families Act guarantees workers the right to earn up to seven paid sick days to care for themselves or a loved one who is sick; the Family and Medical Insurance Leave Actensures that workers can take paid family and medical leave when they need it; the Schedules that Work Act provides flexible, predictable and stable work schedules; and the Strong Start for America’s Children Act gives workers access to high-quality, early-learning opportunities, and more affordable, stable child care.
  • Level the playing field. Discrimination remains a persistent barrier to working families’ ability to get ahead. The Resolution includes the Paycheck Fairness Act which strengthens protections from pay discrimination to help close the wage gap; the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act which ensures that women can get reasonable job accommodations when they need them to continue working safely during pregnancy; and the Equality Act which makes unmistakably clear that workplace discrimination against LGBT individuals is illegal.

The Working Families Resolution has 109 House cosponsors: Rosa L. DeLauro, Donna F. Edwards, Linda T. Sánchez, Judy Chu, Keith Ellison, Raúl M. Grijalva, Lois Frankel, Doris O. Matsui, Frederica S. Wilson, Jerrold Nadler, David N. Cicilline, Mark Pocan, Jared Polis, Katherine M. Clark, Suzanne Bonamici, Joe Courtney, Susan Davis, Mark DeSaulnier, Marcia L. Fudge, Rubén Hinojosa, Hakeem S. Jeffries, Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan, Mark Takano, Donald S. Beyer, Jr., Luis V. Gutiérrez, Bonnie Watson Coleman, Barbara Lee, Ann Kirkpatrick, Alan Grayson, Marcy Kaptur, Jim McDermott, Jan Schakowsky, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Sheila Jackson Lee, Gregory W. Meeks, John K. Delaney, Paul Tonko, Cheri Bustos, André Carson, Kathy Castor, Danny K. Davis, Louise M. Slaughter, Donald M. Payne, Jr., Yvette D. Clarke, Michael M. Honda, Chaka Fattah, Brenda L. Lawrence, James R. Langevin, Carolyn B. Maloney, Niki Tsongas, Seth Moulton, Theodore E. Deutch, Corrine Brown, Loretta Sanchez, Janice Hahn, Terri A. Sewell, Robert A. Brady, Mark Takai, Mike Quigley, James P. McGovern, Alma S. Adams, Betty McCollum, Gene Green, John Lewis, John Garamendi, Tony Cárdenas, Jared Huffman, José E. Serrano, Grace F. Napolitano, Steve Cohen, Lucille Roybal-Allard, Bill Pascrell, Jr., Chris Van Hollen, Alcee L. Hastings, Brendan F. Boyle, Elijah E. Cummings, Frank Pallone, Jr., Tim Ryan, Grace Meng, Eddie Bernice Johnson, John Conyers, Jr., Albio Sires, Emanuel Cleaver, Adam Smith, Marc A. Veasey, Chellie Pingree, Sanford D. Bishop, Jr., Cedric L. Richmond, Earl Blumenauer, Al Green, Derek Kilmer, Debbie Dingell, Joaquin Castro, Robin L. Kelly, Eliot L. Engel, Ted W. Lieu, Daniel T. Kildee, Charles B. Rangel, Tammy Duckworth, Kathleen M. Rice, David E. Price, Wm. Lacy Clay, Rick Larsen, Sam Farr, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Lois Capps, Brian Higgins, Joyce Beatty, Donald Norcross

In addition to today’s resolution, the Education & the Workforce Democrats released state report cards highlighting nationwide and statewide trends affecting working families.  All report cards can be found here and below:

Working Families Report Card: Alabama PDF

Working Families Report Card: Alaska PDF

Working Families Report Card: Arizona PDF

Working Families Report Card: Arkansas PDF

Working Families Report Card: California PDF

Working Families Report Card: Colorado PDF

Working Families Report Card: Connecticut PDF

Working Families Report Card: Delaware PDF

Working Families Report Card: Florida PDF

Working Families Report Card: Georgia PDF

Working Families Report Card: Hawaii PDF 

Working Families Report Card: Idaho PDF

Working Families Report Card: Illinois PDF

Working Families Report Card: Indiana PDF

Working Families Report Card: Iowa PDF 

Working Families Report Card: Kansas PDF

Working Families Report Card: Kentucky PDF

Working Families Report Card: Louisiana PDF

Working Families Report Card: Maine PDF

Working Families Report Card: Maryland PDF

Working Families Report Card: Massachusetts PDF

Working Families Report Card: Michigan PDF

Working Families Report Card: Minnesota PDF

Working Families Report Card: Mississippi PDF

Working Families Report Card: Missouri PDF

Working Families Report Card: Montana PDF

Working Families Report Card: Nebraska PDF

Working Families Report Card: Nevada PDF

Working Families Report Card: New Hampshire PDF

Working Families Report Card: New Jersey PDF

Working Families Report Card: New Mexico PDF

Working Families Report Card: New York PDF

Working Families Report Card: North Carolina PDF

Working Families Report Card: North Dakota PDF

Working Families Report Card: Ohio PDF

Working Families Report Card: Oklahoma PDF

Working Families Report Card: Oregon PDF

Working Families Report Card: Pennsylvania PDF

Working Families Report Card: Rhode Island PDF

Working Families Report Card: South Carolina PDF

Working Families Report Card: South Dakota PDF

Working Families Report Card: Tennessee PDF

Working Families Report Card: Texas PDF

Working Families Report Card: Utah PDF

Working Families Report Card: Vermont PDF

Working Families Report Card: Virginia PDF

Working Families Report Card: Washington PDF

Working Families Report Card: West Virginia PDF

Working Families Report Card: Wisconsin PDF

Working Families Report Card: Wyoming PDF

Working Families Report Card: District of Columbia PDF

All report cards can be found here.

The Cubicle Chick

Share