This Video Debunks 10 Misconceptions About Hiccup Cures

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Everyone seems to have a special cure for the hiccups, but there is very little scientific evidence to support most of them. This video reveals which remedies don’t quite add up and explains why.

The hiccups are one of the more bizarre spontaneous reactions your body can have, and very little is known about why they come about. Still, we don’t like them and want them to go away. In this video from the Mental Floss YouTube channel, host Elliott Morgan debunks several of the most popular home remedies. For example, don’t hold your breath on holding your breath or breathing into a paper bag; save the scaring for Halloween; drinking water will only hydrate you; and specially made “hiccup lollipops” probably aren’t the miracle cure you’re looking for. If you’ve got the hiccups from drinking alcohol, however, biting into a lemon wedge that’s been soaked in Angostura bitters might help. Additionally, a spoonful of peanut butter or sugar might help your hiccups as well, but there is no official cure out there at this time.

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Misconceptions about Hiccups | YouTube

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This Video Debunks 10 Misconceptions About Exercise

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Whether you’re exercising to lose weight or just to be healthy, it’s important you do it right. This video takes on some of the most popular myths around exercise and clears things up for you.

How long should you hold on to your running shoes? Is there a magical heart rate level for fat burning? Mental Floss YouTube host Elliott Morgan is here to demystify some popular old wives’ tales you may have heard before. Things like running on a treadmill isn’t necessarily better for your knees, you don’t need to be sweating a waterfall to be getting a good workout, sit-ups won’t get you a six pack, and that most fitness machines in the gym can’t accurately count how many calories you’ve burned. We’ve covered a few these before, like the fact that stretching before exercise doesn’t necessarily lower the risk of injury and that “no pain, no gain” is terrible device, but when it comes to exercise, incorrect knowledge can lead to you doing more work than you need or worse, injury.

Misconceptions about Exercise | YouTube

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