When to Start Cooking Vegetables in Cold or Hot Water

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When to Start Cooking Vegetables in Cold or Hot Water

There’s more to cooking vegetables than tossing them in a pot. Some cook more evenly when heated up gradually, while others should be put directly into boiling water. So when do you use which?

http://lifehacker.com/cook-vegetable…

This rule is simple to remember:

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  • Vegetables that grow underground (potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips), should start off in cold water.
  • Vegetables that grow above ground (greens, peas, corn) should be placed into already boiling water.

Farmers’ Almanac explains why this technique works:

Cooking the corn, peas, etc. simply entails softening their cell walls to make them more palatable and easier to digest. Because most green vegetables are small and/or thin, this doesn’t take long. So you add those to boiling water. Root vegetables contain a great deal of starch, which needs to be dissolved before they can be eaten. As root vegetables cook, “It takes a while for the heat to penetrate. Starting root vegetables out in cold water and heating the outside layers gradually allows the cell walls get reinforced and become more resistant to the effects of overcooking.”

This works especially well on starchy root veggies, like potatoes, since the gradual temperature change keeps the outer edges from overcooking and turning mealy.

When to Boil Water | Farmers’ Almanac via Facebook

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Where to Shop for Groceries, Based on When You Plan on Cooking

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Where to Shop for Groceries, Based on When You Plan on Cooking

We have quite a few types of stores to buy groceries from: specialty markets, big box stores like Costco, and your conventional supermarket among them. While it’s more convenient to get all your food from one place, you can save a bunch on your grocery bill by shopping around.

TheKitchn offers some suggestions for what’s worth buying at your conventional grocery store (loss leaders like eggs, milk, and bananas) and when to shop elsewhere. For produce, for example, if you plan on cooking tonight, you’ll get better prices on ripe, eat-as-soon-as-possible fruits and vegetables at an Aldi or an Asian market. If you’re planning for the week Costco would be a better bet. On the other hand, for meats you plan on cooking tonight, your regular grocery store’s manager’s specials.

You’ll have to weigh the time and gas costs of shopping at different stores with the savings you see by playing this grocery game, but it might be worth it to you if you want to save the most money on food.

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These Are the Groceries You Should Shop Around For | TheKitchn

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