So You Want a Raise: Five Things You Need to Do

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So You Want a Raise Five Things You Need to Do

You’ve put in work. You’ve excelled at your position and have made the powers that be happy. Not only have you outperformed others in your department, but people at work sing your praises. Things are looking up and you feel like you deserve a raise.

You probably do.

But getting a raise isn’t about how you feel you are performing. There are a lot of other things that play a part of if you get a raise or not. And while I can’t assure you or guarantee you that you will get a raise based on A-B-C, I can tell you from a management and HR standpoint what you need to do to make your chances that much higher.

If you want a raise, make sure you are doing these five things:

Do Your Research

Do you know what other people in your department are making (or at least, a round about figure)? Do you know what others are making in your field as a whole? Make sure before you request a raise or step into your job performance review that you know where you salary wise in comparison to others. Do your research and check websites like Salary.com and GetRaised.com to know where you stand. If you go in trying to get too much before knowing what others in your field and with your experience are getting, you may be making a counterproductive move. If you don’t know what to ask for (or what is realistic to ask for), then you may be setting yourself up for failure.

People Buy From People They Like. Be Likeable

This is an old saying from back in my sales days, but it still rings true. When you are likable, then you are more likely to get what you want. Be likable. Be a team player. Be approachable. If you aren’t someone who others are willing to go to bat for, then asking for a raise may not result in you actually getting one. Being likable doesn’t mean being fake or phony. But it means having a personality that others find pleasant.

Know Your Company’s Financial Position

If your workplace has been laying off or firing a lot of people (or on a hiring freeze), this may not be the time to ask for a raise. These are sure signs of financial problems or issues with income flow. Make sure you have a grasp of your company’s financial position before thinking about getting a raise or asking for one.

Look Elsewhere

Getting a raise may mean looking for a position elsewhere. See what companies are hiring in your field and strategize. Would the grass be greener and more plentiful elsewhere? Has your current job failed to give your raises or promotions in the past? if so, you may want to try to get a bigger paycheck where you will be better appreciated.

Stack Up Certifications and Education

Going back to school and upping the ante in your education is a surefire way to get a raise. More certifications and knowledge under your belt means that you can get paid more. And the more you know how to do, the more valuable you are in your company. If your employer has tuition reimbursement or pays for additional education and certification, by all means, take advantage of it. Then turn around, and use that to your advantage.

We all want to make more money if we can, but we also have to make sure we have the right outlook and the rights tools. Wanting a raise and actually getting it are two different things, but I hope that the tips above can help lead you in the right direction to become prosperous in your request.

Good luck!

The Cubicle Chick

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