8 Ways Hospitality Brands Can Use Vine for Marketing

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8 Ways Hospitality Brands Can Use Vine for Marketing
Even though Meerkat is currently the talk of the town, many marketers are still undervaluing the possibilities with Twitter’s other product, Vine.

Vine is a social video platform slowing you to capture or upload a video that plays in short, looping segment. Each video can only be six seconds long, aligning, in theory, with the brevity of tweets (at just 140 characters) as well.

Like foursquare, Vine is a standalone application, accessible only through your mobile device. With a very minimalist design and user-friendly interface, the application is fairly simple to get acquainted with.

Vine in itself is similar to Instagram, except it is only for videos. In addition to being disbursed through to Facebook and Twitter, vines are shared among users of the app itself, and they can also be re-vined, or shared with other users, commented on and liked.

Many businesses in the hospitality space have used Vine in a variety of ways. Let’s take a look at some hotels and dining establishments that are using Vine for marketing.

In early 2014, Dunkin Donuts became the first brand to create Vines to be showcased as commercials.

The brand published three fun, historical, Super Bowl-themed Vines that appeared as animated, five-second commercials around the Super Bowl. The spots were also shared among Dunkin Donut’s own social media channels.

Dominos uses Vine heavily to promote new deals like their #PicknMixDeal and #WinterSurvivalDeal. By invoking humor, they’re able to promote their offerings in a human, entertaining way that doesn’t require sales tactics.

That said, it’s not necessarily a bad thing to use Vine to more explicitly promote products.

Chili’s Bar & Grill also uses Vine to showcase specific offers, such as their specialty margaritas. They also add calls-to-action to explicitly encourage their fans to share.

Frozen yogurt company Red Mango takes a more fun approach. This playful, dancing cup of hot chocolate shows that Vine can be used to be silly. Red Mango in Sioux Falls, South Dakota showed people how magical their products are by making their hot chocolate dance. Since frozen yogurt has a strong kid audience, creating marketing initiatives that children will find entertaining as well can be beneficial.

It can also be useful to create “how to” type Vines to educate your audience. Fearrington Village House Restaurant used Vine to briefly show the process of mixing an exciting cocktail.

Witnessing a cocktail being created in this manner ads a layer of intimacy with both the restaurant itself as well as the drink, more than if a simple photo of the cocktail had been posted once it was made.

Four Seasons has also integrated Vine into its marketing campaigns. Partnering with Shoutlet, the luxury hotel brand came up with a highly engaging and interactive campaign featuring “Maxine,” a lovable fuzzy plush toy. Through a family- friendly and child-focused Facebook contest, #MaxineTakesManhattan, Four Seasons Hotel New York aimed to generate awareness about the hotel and increase weekend bookings for families during the summer months. The team supplemented the contest with Instagram posts and kicked off the promotion with Maxine’s own Vine Video on Twitter and Facebook.

Hotels can also utilize Vine to conduct virtual tours of their properties. This is the perfect means for creating 360-degree tours of each of guestrooms, set up with different seating arrangements.

On the meeting side, Vine is great for assisting with providing clients a better sense of the meeting space available, and giving them an idea of how their event would look in your hotel.

You can also film quick tours of any other outlet the planner said was important to their attendees, such as the business center or fitness center.

Roger Smith Hotel in New York, known for its quirky social media personality, uses Vine as more of a personal outlet. They showcase the personalities of many of their staff members as well as area events and happenings. If you landed on their Vine profile and didn’t know who it belong to, you would likely be inclined to believe it’s a personal account rather than a business account.

What are some of your favorite brands on Vine?

Debbie Miller
Debbie Miller contributes a monthly column on Social Media for the Hospitality Industry. Debbie is the President of Social Hospitality where she provides clients with writing, editing, and social media services. She is also the Social Media Manager for Search Engine Journal and the Digital Communications Manager for HyperDisk Marketing. Prior, Debbie worked for a destination marketing organization and now has 8 years of hospitality marketing experience. Debbie has also taught social media courses and speaks at industry events. When she’s not online, Debbie enjoys spending time with her spoiled dog children; watching movies; reading; and drinking copious amounts of coffee or wine. +Debbie Miller
Debbie Miller

@sochospitality

Covering trends related to hospitality and social media, technology, marketing, branding, customer service, engagement, SEO, blogging. Founder: @TheBigDebowski
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Debbie Miller
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